Grad Success Week

May 7 – 9, 2019
Connect with experts, student leaders and your fellow grad students in three days of sessions designed to support your research, writing and well-being. See full schedule below.

Grad Success Week offers something for every graduate student:

  • Hear from faculty on how to get published
  • Learn strategies to enhance your writing, reading, research and presentations skills
  • Familiarize yourself with technology for collecting, analyzing and presenting data in our demonstration sessions
  • Build different approaches for tackling common grad school obstacles
  • Network with professionals, academics and your peers
Students

This summer, count on being productive. Grad Success Week offers three days of seminars and events designed to help you overcome common grad school obstacles and get down to business on your research and writing projects.

See below for full schedule and description of workshops and events or download the condensed schedule.

Events Schedule for Graduate Success Week

These sessions are categorized to help you better determine which ones are a better fit for you. All students are welcome to attend any of the sessions during Grad Success Week.

Core: Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content are)
Intermediate: Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies
Advanced: Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program

Breakfast with the Dean: Join Interim Dean and Vice-Provost, Faculty of Graduate Studies and fellow students
9 – 10:20 a.m.

Sign up early and secure your spot for our Breakfast with the Dean event with Dr. Robin Yates, Interim Dean and Vice Provost, Graduate Studies.

Dr. Robin Yates is Interim Dean and Vice Provost of Graduate Studies. In his previous role as Associate Dean (Student), Dr. Yates worked directly with graduate studies navigating the challenges of graduate school, and as Interim Dean, he remains committed to enriching the graduate student experience. Dr. Yates is a Professor of Immunology who joined the University of Calgary 2008 with a joint appointment in the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Cumming School of Medicine. He holds a PhD in Comparative Biomedical Sciences from Cornell University, a Masters in Tertiary Education Management from the University of Melbourne, as well as Bachelor’s degrees in both Veterinary Science and Microbiology from the University of Queensland.

Let's Talk Supervisor: From Bad to Good, or From Good to Great
10:30 – 11:50 a.m.

What are the most common issues students face in working with a supervisor? This workshop explores what two specialists in student-supervisor conflict have learned in their work with over 300 students, and what they wish all students knew from day one! This session provides participants with opportunities to discuss and practise tried-and-true strategies for navigating the student-supervisor relationship.

Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will be supported in:

  • Developing a personalized communication toolkit for working with a supervisor
  • Working through example scenarios to brainstorm solutions and practice different communication strategies

 
Presenter information
J. Dixit, MA, Graduate Academic and International Specialist, Faculty of Graduate Studies
M. Speta, PhD, Graduate Academic and International Specialist, Faculty of Graduate Studies

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Articles that Get Published: Arts and Social Science
10:30 – 11:50 a.m.

Have you ever wondered what journal editors are looking for or what to expect going through the publishing process? Get the inside scoop on getting published in peer-reviewed journals in the Arts and Social Sciences. Featuring a panel of distinguished faculty with extensive knowledge and experience in academic publishing, this session will offer a journal editor’s perspective on what stops a paper from making it to the peer-review stage, what kinds of writing engage reviewers as well as practical advice (e.g., how to select which journal to submit to, how to handle harsh feedback from reviewers). In this session, students will have the opportunity to ask questions to panellists.
 
Presenter information
G. McDermid, PhD, Professor, Department of Geography
S. Madigan, PhD, R.Psych, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology
M. Migotti, PhD Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy

Moderators: J. Mian, MSc., Coordinator, Scholars Programs, Student Success Centre; K. Gorgichuk, MEd., Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)

Feeling Like a Fraud? Overcoming Imposter Syndrome in Graduate School
10:30 – 11:50 a.m.

Do you ever feel like you are not smart enough, skilled enough, creative enough for Grad school? Do you fear to be one mistake or bad effort away from being revealed as an imposter? These thoughts are so common for Grad students they have earned the name “Imposter Syndrome”. Come demystify this experience and learn some helpful strategies to boost your confidence and keep you on the road to academic success.
 
Learning outcomes
In this session, through reflection and discussion, participants will:

  • Learn how to identify imposter syndrome
  • Participate in four activities that can boost self-confidence and self-efficacy to support the achievement of academic goals

Presenter information
Jennifer Thannhauser, PhD, RPsych
Counsellor (Wellness Centre)

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Developing Research Proposals
1 – 2:20 p.m.

This session will cover the fundamentals of starting, developing and refining a research proposal and progress to a more detailed discussion on proposal writing. The presenters, one with a background in the Arts, the other from the Sciences, will relate their experiences of research proposal writing, including tips and strategies to help students clearly define their research question and demonstrate their qualifications and suitability to carry out their study. The importance of accuracy, abstract structure, self-editing, incorporating feedback, a succinct and relevant literature review and an impactful but realistic statement on the work’s contribution to its field of study and society at large will be covered.
*There is a separate session that covers writing proposals for scholarship applications.
 
Learning outcomes
After attending this session, participants will:

  • Have new strategies and ideas for how to make writing a research proposal a more efficient and enjoyable process

 
Presenter information
K. Quinn, PhD, Academic Advisor, Student Success Centre
J. Secord, PhD, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)

Manage your Research Identity and Track your Impact
1 – 2:20 p.m.

How do you stand out in a crowded field of researchers? How can you present a coherent picture of your research and its impact when applying to postgraduate programs? This session will introduce you to tools to create a researcher profile that highlights your expertise, as well as methods for tracking the impact of your work.

Learning outcomes
After attending this session, participants will:

  • Understand how to create a personal account in various researcher identification systems
  • Understand the metrics for assessing research impact
  • Be able to use tools to track the impact of their own research

 
Presenter(s)
Heather Ganshorn, MLIS, Associate Librarian, Libraries and Cultural Resources
 
Intended Audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Presenting Your Research: J. Parsons, MA, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre
1 – 2:20 p.m.

Are you prepared to share your research progress or results in an academic setting?  This workshop focuses on creating a clear and appealing visual and oral presentation that accurately represents your research findings without overwhelming your audience.
 
Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will:

  • Review and discuss the features of an accessible, comprehensive, and interesting research presentation
  • Review and discuss strategies for effective public speaking

 
Presenter information
Jennifer Parsons, MA, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre
 
Intended audience
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)

From Candidacy to Completion: Connection, Support and Goals
2:30 – 3:50 p.m.

Have you (not so) recently completed your candidacy requirements? Are you unsure about how to stay connected and motivated in the long stretch to your defence? Come and hear from students who have successfully navigated from candidacy to completion, connect with a community of peers and campus supports, and set goals to finish your degree strong!
 
Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will:

  • Connect with a community of graduate students and campus supports
  • Learn from graduate students who have successfully navigated their degrees
  • Discover a variety of ways to remain motivated and connected during the next stage of their graduate program
  • Set short-term goals to foster success in graduate school and beyond

 
Presenter information
S. Warner, PhD, PhD Career Development Specialist, Career Services
 
Intended audience
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)

How to Avoid Unethical Scholarship
2:30 – 3:50 p.m.

Being a graduate student means being on the cutting edge of research and properly acknowledging sources is as important as the research itself. In this informal panel discussion, we will talk about what ethical scholarship means during research, writing and publishing your work. In addition to unpacking the institutional definition of academic integrity, this discussion will also provide participants with a variety of strategies to prevent unintentional plagiarism. Key topics covered could include: locating quality sources, note-taking and reading strategies for writing effective summaries of scholarly articles, citing your own work, acknowledging data repositories, paraphrasing research and the question of hiring professional editors.
 
Learning outcomes
In this session participants will:

  • Explore the notion of ethical scholarship
  • Understand the importance of citing properly

 
Presenter information
Sarah Elaine Eaton, PhD, Werklund School of Education
L. Penaluna, MSc, Coordinator Academic Integrity Programs
L. Morrow, Interim Associate University Librarian, Research and Learning Director, Learner Support and Engagement Services, Libraries and Cultural Resources
Moderator: C. McClurg, Libraries and Cultural Resources Associate Librarian, Teaching and Learning
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Research Data Management
2:30 – 4 p.m.

Learn about research data management. Research data, whether made up of spreadsheets, interview transcripts, image collections, digital records, or other material, will be crucial to your career as a graduate student and researcher. Properly managing this data you will save you time and headaches by ensuring your data is not accidentally lost while making your data easier to work with and verifying your research findings. This session will focus on how to manage your data before, during, and after your research, as well as describe how to use Data Management Plan Assistant, a Canadian online tool for creating data management plans.
 
Learning outcomes

In this session participants will:

  • Learn what is involved in research data management and why it is useful for their current and future research activities
  • Gain knowledge of the elements of a data management plan and experience developing a plan for an example scenario
  • Learn how to find and make use of DMP Assistant

 
Presenter information
J. Brosz, PhD, Coordinator of Research Data and Visualization, Libraries and Cultural Resources
H. Ganshorn, MLIS, Associate Librarian, Libraries and Cultural Resources
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

 

Strategies for Writing Literature Reviews
10 – 11:50 a.m.

A literature review is more than a series of summaries.  It presents a synthesis of current knowledge that connects to and informs your own research.  This workshop focuses on resources and strategies for researching and criteria for selecting literature.  It will also demonstrate ways to draft, revise and present your final review.
 
Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will learn critical reading and writing strategies as they prepare to write theses, candidacy exams, or dissertations. After attending this session, participants will know how to ask better research questions, how to adapt projects to internal and external changes, and how to make necessary editorial decisions when meeting deadlines.
 
Presenter information
M, Howell, BA, Graduate student, Academic Strategist/Writing Tutor, Student Success Centre
T.A. Pattinson, PhD, Writing Tutor, Student Success Centre
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Research Project Management
10 – 11:50 a.m.

Applying project management principles to a large research project like the dissertation can help you avoid challenges with supervision, procrastination, feelings of being overwhelmed, scheduling, and motivation.

Learning outcomes
By the end of this session, participants will have learned:

  • How to apply basic project management principles to the management of their research project
  • What factors to consider in choosing project management software

Presenter information
P. Papin, PhD, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre

Intended audience
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)

Demonstration: Reference Management Tools
10:40 – 11:10 a.m.

Learn about reference management tools and the features and functionalities they provide. This session will give you a brief overview of EndNote, Mendeley and Zotero.

Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will:

  • Learn how reference management tools can support and enhance their research

 
Presenter information
Marc Stoeckle, Research & Learning Librarian, TFDL
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)

Demonstration: Research Survey Tools - Qualtrics
12:30 – 1 p.m.

This session is specifically targeted to students considering using the university survey tool, Qualtrics, for research purposes. An overview of the main capabilities of the Research Core along with available training and support will be presented. Special attention will be given to reporting your collected responses.
 
Learning outcomes
After attending this session, participants will:

  • Identify the purpose of each component of Qualtrics Research Core
  • Understand how data visualization can be accomplished through Qualtrics

Presenter information
L. Boyer, PhD, Institutional Analyst, Survey Services Lead, Office of Institutional Analysis
 
Intended audience
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)

Demonstration: Analyzing Data with Quantitative Tools - Getting Started with IBM SPSS
1 – 1:30 p.m.

Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) is a very popular statistical analysis tool that has been around a long time.  It is largely used to analyze quantitative data. The University of Calgary has a license for SPSS, so it is available to students, staff and faculty.  This demo will show you the basics of getting started.
 
Learning outcomes
At the end of this session, participants will be able to load a data file into SPSS and conduct basic descriptive analysis. Participants will see the basic layout of SPSS so that they can navigate to its various functions.
 
Presenter information
Jean Gomes, MA, is a senior institutional analyst with the Office of Institutional Analysis.
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the   content area)

Preparing and Presenting an Abstract for a Conference
1 – 2:20 p.m.

Have you ever wanted to present your research at an academic research conference? Unsure of how to go about it? How to fund your travel? Come participate in a workshop designed to help you answer these questions. Participants will be guided to identify appropriate venues to present their research, improve their abstracts, learn about various funding opportunities and present their work. (We encourage participants to bring an abstract they would like feedback on).
 
Learning outcomes
After this session, participants will be able to:

  • Classify appropriate academic conferences
  • Identify ways to finance their conference travel
  • Create abstracts and presentations that are accessible, relevant and interesting

 
Presenter information
Haley Vecchiarelli, PhD Candidate, Neuroscience Graduate Program, Vanier Scholar and Killam Laureate, Lead Graduate Leaders Circle (2018-2019).
 
Intended audience
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)

Demonstration: Analyzing Data with Qualitative Tools - Getting Started with NVivo
1:50 – 2:20 p.m.

NVivo is a top-rated qualitative data analysis tool produced by QSR International.  NVivo supports researchers who need to analyze text-based documents, surveys, and multimedia files.  The University of Calgary has a license for NVivo, so it is available to students, staff and faculty.  This demo will show you the basics on how to get started.
 
Learning outcomes
At the end of this session, participants will be able to load files into NVivo and conduct basic textual analysis. Participants will see the basic layout of NVivo so that they can navigate to its various functions.

Presenter information
Jean Gomes, MA, a senior institutional analyst with the Office of Institutional Analysis.
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Demonstration: Presenting Data: LaTeX
2:30 – 3 p.m.

LaTex is an open source typesetting program designed to produce professional documents and PDF files. Unlike conventional writing tools (i.e., MS Word), LaTex allows users to focus on content and structure while leaving the formatting to the program. In this session, we will review and demonstrate the basic commands and functions within LaTex, required for producing academic documents.
 
Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will:

  • Successfully install LaTex and related components
  • Become familiar with tools for producing mathematical equations, figures, citations, and corresponding reference list
  • Use latex and various templates to produce professionally looking/typeset PDF documents

 
Presenter information
Hormoz Izadi, Doctoral student in geophysics (Department of Geosciences), Writing instructor,
Student Success Centre
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Time Management and Avoiding Procrastination
2:30 – 3:50 p.m.

During this workshop, you will set priorities to get started on work, learn to manage your time, understand why you procrastinate, and learn strategies to keep motivated.
 
Learning outcomes
After attending this session, participants will have a greater understanding of factors influencing motivation, learn about their procrastination patterns and learn strategies to manage their time and reduce procrastination.
 
Presenter information
Jeff Vander Werf, M.Sc., R.Psych., Counsellor/Academic Success Coordinator, SU Wellness Centre - Counselling
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Critical Thinking and Scholarly Writing
2:30 – 3:50 p.m.

This workshop will help students understand the structure of academic argumentation through claims, evidence and warrants. We will also consider a few critical thinking themes that form the blueprint for all academic writing. These include critiquing a position based on concept/ point of view, strength of evidence, flaws in reasoning and underlying epistemological assumptions. Students will have the chance to connect these themes to their own research.
 
Learning outcomes
At the end of this session, participants will be able to apply critical thinking themes to improve their own scholarly writing.
 
Presenter information
W. Hatherell, PhD, Writing Tutor, Student Success Centre
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Developing Strong Applications to Apply for Graduate Funding 
9 – 10:30 a.m.

In this workshop, graduate students will become familiar with the various sources of funding and how and when they can apply for scholarships, awards, and bursaries. Students will also obtain an overview of the criteria and the components that make a strong application. Moreover, a discussion regarding how reviewers assess students' applications will be provided. Examples will be provided on the competitive processes including Vanier, Killam, and GAC applications.
 
Learning outcomes
After this session, participants will have a better understanding of the numerous sources of funding available through the University of Calgary. They will also be aware of the resources that can help them construct an effective application. Students also will become familiar with the criteria of the scholarships and how reviewers consider candidate applications.
 
Presenter information
Lucie Nurdin, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Science, Vanier Scholar, GLC Co-Leader
Donna-Marie McCafferty, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Department of Physiology & Pharmacology
Rebecca Haines-Saah, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences
Alaa Dabboor, MSc Geomatics Engineering, Writing Support Administrator and Tutor
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

LinkedIn: Presenting Yourself Professionally 
9 – 10:20 a.m.

LinkedIn is a professional networking tool used by millions of people worldwide.  It’s often the first place employers will go to learn more about you. In this workshop, we’ll discuss how you can own the message you’re portraying, as well as use LinkedIn to effectively learn about potential careers and make valuable connections.
 
Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will:

  • Discuss personal branding, social networking, and using LinkedIn effectively
  • Review common features of LinkedIn, including building professional profiles, connecting with others, and searching for jobs
  • Start to build their own online presence by working directly on their LinkedIn profile

 
Presenter information
Stephanie Warner, PhD
PhD Career Development Specialist, Career Services
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)

Self-Compassion: Why is it so hard to be nice to myself? 
10:30 – 11:50 a.m.

As a graduate student, how do you treat yourself whenever you suffer, fail, or feel inadequate? It is our hope this workshop will help kick start your journey to reducing self-judgment and criticism and increasing your motivation with kindness. We all have a “critical inner voice”, but we can learn to respond to it and ourselves in a more kind, compassionate way.
 
Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will:

  • Defining self-compassion vs. self-esteem
  • Develop skills for increasing self-compassion and shame resilience through self-compassion
  • Motivate yourself with kindness rather than self-criticism
  • Build a self-compassion practice as an antidote to perfectionism and shame

 
Presenter information
Kome Odoko, BScN, MN(C), RN., Student Support Case Management Coordinator, Student Wellness Center
 
Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)

Reading for Structure 
10:30 – 11:50 a.m.

Do you have trouble finding a clear path through the dense forest of information that is an academic journal article? In this workshop you’ll learn how to orient yourself as you read by looking for the structural signposts that are common to journal articles in multiple disciplines. Using a sample journal article, we’ll practise identifying (and distinguishing between) the research problem, background to the research problem, the importance of the research problem, the research gap, methodology and its justifications, explanations for differences between past and present results, limitations on results, and suggestions for further research.

Learning outcomes
In this session, participants will learn to

     • Identify key structural elements of journal articles
     • Use this ability to reduce a complex article to its basic structure

Presenter information
P. Papin, PhD, Academic Development Specialist, Student Success Centre

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Demonstration: Successful Academic Posters 
12:30 – 1 p.m.

Conference season is upon us! Academic posters are effective research communication and networking tools common to conferences. This session will cover the basics of creating and presenting them.

Learning outcomes:
After attending this session, participants will:

  • Be familiar with the content and layout of academic posters
  • Access templates and materials for creating academic posters

Presenter information
Jennifer Lee, MISt, Liaison Librarian, Libraries and Cultural Resources

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Demonstration: Tableau

In this demonstration we present the basics on how to use Tableau, a tool capable of creating a wide variety of data visualizations. Tableau (http://www.tableausoftware.com) supports of variety of data formats and through simple interactions allows fast exploration to find the visualization most suited to the data. Additionally Tableau offers their desktop software free to post-secondary students.

Presenter information

John Brosz, PhD, MSc, BSc. Visualization and Research Data Coordinator, Libraries and Cultural Resources.

Intended audience

Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to grad school or new to the content area)

Articles that Get Published: Science and Engineering 
1 – 2:20 p.m.

Have you ever wondered what journal editors are looking for or what to expect going through the publishing process? Get the inside scoop on getting published in peer-reviewed journals in Science and Engineering. Featuring a panel of distinguished faculty with extensive knowledge and experience in academic publishing, this session will offer a journal editor’s perspective on what stops a paper from making it to the peer-review stage, what kinds of writing engage reviewers as well as practical advice (e.g., how to select which journal to submit to, how to handle harsh feedback from reviewers). In this session students will have the opportunity to ask questions to panelists.

Presenter information
G. Shimizu,
 
Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary and Associate Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Calgary
N. Nassar, PhD, PEng, MRSC, MACS, Associate Professor, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
E. Stefanakis, PhD, Professor and Department Head, Geomatics Engineering, Department of Geomatics Engineering

Moderators
A. Dabboor, MSc, Writing Support Administrator and Writing Tutor
M. Speta, PhD, Graduate International and Academic Advisor

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)

Sustainable Leadership: Avoiding Burnout 
1 – 2:20 p.m.

In this interactive session, you will learn how you can achieve your goals and be a more effective leader by engaging in leadership planning, practicing self-care, and setting boundaries. We will be discussing practical, hands on strategies to help you lead sustainably over the long-term.

Learning outcomes

In this session participants will:

  • Enhance their understanding of burnout and related symptoms
  • Identify their personal leadership strengths, priorities and goals
  • Develop strategies to maintain high performance as a leader and academic 

Presenter information
Victoria Hirsche, Coordinator, Leadership and Training Programs, Leadership and Student Engagement

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)

Graduate Writing Community
1 – 4 p.m.

Tired of writing your thesis alone? Join us for this session of the Graduate Writing Community (GWC), a mini-writing retreat that meets every Monday and Thursday afternoon in a sunny space on the 3rd floor of the TFDL.

Here's what the GWC has to offer:

  1. Drop-in writing tutor: book a half hour with our drop-in tutor when you arrive, and get private writing support during the session
  2. Roaming writing tutor: remain in the main room and get help from our roaming writing tutor whenever the need arises
  3. During the first half-hour of each session, you can leave the main room for an optional breakout session on a topic relevant to graduate-level reading, research or writing. Upcoming topics will be announced here
  4. Graduate peer coaching: A graduate peer coach will be available to help you with other aspects of academic success, including time management, motivation, supervisor relations, and life balance
  5. A productive environment: draw on the collective energy of your fellow students as you motor towards completion! You bring your computer; we’ll supply the coffee and the granola bars

Intended audience
Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)

Rising Leader Forum – More than talk: leadership skills to address challenges in research and society
2:30 – 3:50 p.m.

This discussion and Q&A panel featuring 5 expert panelists explores how academics and non-academics can use leadership skills to address challenges in research and society. There will be 40 minutes of debate followed by 30 minutes for audience questions. Grad Success Week 2019 marks the first opportunity that all graduate students will have to attend an event historically offered only to a select group of students. Refreshments and snacks will be provided from 2 – 2:30 p.m. and the panel will start at 2:30 p.m.

Learning outcomes
During this debate, students will be exposed to controversial research and learn how to develop and use their leadership skills to address difficult or ethically complex issues they might encountered during their graduate studies and in society. It will also provide them with the opportunity to raise questions and come up with collective answers.

The five panelists are:

Dr. Jorg Denzinger, Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, University of Calgary

Dr. Jennifer Leason, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary

Jeremy Klaszus, Founder and Editor of The Sprawl, a Calgary pop-up journalism startup

Dr. Rebecca Haines-Saah, Assistant Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary.

Dr. Jennifer Adams, Associate Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary

Moderator:
Lucie Nurdin, PhD Candidate, Co-Leader of the Graduate Leader Forum, University of Calgary

Intended audience
This discussion panel is open to all graduate students

Core (Sessions intended for any graduate student new to graduate school or new to the content area)
Intermediate (Sessions intended for graduate students who are beyond their first year of graduate studies)
Advanced (Sessions intended for graduate students who are nearing the end of their program of study)