Hockey

SAFE TO PLAY

A longitudinal research program to establish best practice in the prevention, early diagnosis and treatment for sport-related concussion


What are we trying to find out?

To study how youth ice hockey players’ brains normally function and what changes might happen after they sustain a concussion.

Who is participating in this study?

Youth ice hockey players playing in Peewee, Bantam, and Midget in Calgary and Edmonton will be followed for up to 5 years during the 2013-2018 hockey seasons.

Why are we doing this research?

Concussions are the most common injury type in youth ice hockey and can lead to long-term side effects. Looking at the changes that may happen after a concussion will help us develop best practice for treatment following concussion as well as prevention strategies.

What do participants have to do?

Players will complete concussion baseline testing at the beginning of each hockey season (Summer/Fall) and will be followed throughout the season. If they sustain a concussion they will be treated by a study Sport Medicine physician until they are medically cleared to return to play. Tests completed at the concussion baseline test will be repeated at initial physician appointment and return to play appointment. Hockey-related injuries lasting longer than 7-days will be assessed by study staff.

Evaluating the effect of body checking in youth ice hockey players


What are we trying to find out?

The purpose of the study is to compare the injury risk among youth ice hockey players who are exposed to body checking with those in similar divisions that do not allow body checking.

Who is participating in this study?

Male youth ice hockey teams in Peewee (Calgary 2013-2015), Bantam (Calgary 2014-2016; Edmonton 2014-2016; Vancouver 2014-2015; Okanagan 2014-2015), and Midget (Calgary 2015-2017; Edmonton 2015-2017; Vancouver 2015-16) age groups.

Why are we doing this research?

Understanding sport-specific participation and injury rates, risk factors, and current sport safety practices in youth will allow for targeted injury prevention strategies. Policy changes in youth ice hockey have disallowed body checking in certain age groups and divisions at national and regional levels. The impact of these policy changes on player injury risk needs to be evaluated.

What do participants have to do?

Players will complete concussion baseline testing at the beginning of each hockey season (Summer/Fall) and their time spent participating in hockey as well as information about any hockey-related injuries sustained during the season will be tracked. If players sustain a concussion they will be treated by a study Sport Medicine physician until they are medically cleared to return to play. Hockey-related injuries lasting longer than 7-days will be assessed by study staff.

Study Partners

Alberta Innovates

Alberta Innovates

Website

CIHR

Canadian Institutes of Health Research

Website

HBI

The Hotchkiss Brain Institute

Website

Hockey Calgary

Hockey Calgary

Website

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