School-Based Prevention

Implementing a junior high school-based programme to reduce sports injuries

Emery CA, van den Berg C, Richmond SA, Palacios-Derflingher L, McKay CD, Doyle-Baker PK, McKinlay M, Toomey CM, Nettel-Aguirre A, Verhagen E, Belton K, Macpherson A, Hagel BE

Br J Sports Med November 2019


Who participated in this study?

1,067 junior high school students (ages 11-15) participating in physical education classes in 12 schools in Calgary and surrounding area.

When did this study occur?

2014-2017 school years

What did participants have to do?

Schools were randomized into the intervention group (a high-intensity neuromuscular training warm-up program, including aerobic, agility, strength, and balance components; 6 schools) or control group (a standard of practice warm-up including aerobic, dynamic and static stretching components; 6 schools). Teachers in each school implemented their warm-up program at the beginning of physical education classes over a 12-week period. A study therapist visited the schools on a weekly basis to assess any injuries sustained by participating students

Why did we do this research?

To examine the effectiveness of a school-based sports injury prevention warm-up program to reduce injuries through neuromuscular training (NMT). Injuries were defined as any injury sustained through a sport or recreational activity that resulted in time loss, inability to complete a session, or medical attention.

What did we find?

A neuromuscular training program in junior high school physical education classes was effective in reducing sport-related injury by in girls, but not in boys. In girls, iSPRINT demonstrated a 46% reduction in all injuries, a 64% reducing in lower extremity injuries, and a 71% reduction in medical attention injuries when compared to girls in the control group.

Publication

Facilitators and Barriers to the Implementation of iSPRINT

Richmond SA, Donaldson A, Macpherson A, Bridel W, van den Berg C, Finch CF, Hagel B, Emery CA

Clin J Sport Med March 2018


Who participated in this study?

12 junior high schools in Calgary, Alberta

When did this study occur?

2014-2017

Why did we do this research?

To describe the facilitators and barriers to implementation of a sport injury prevention program in junior high school physical education

What did we find?

Facilitators: evidence strength and quality, adaptability, implementation climate, culture, and having a high level of compatibility. Barriers: intervention complexity, planning, and readiness for implementation. Facilitators and barriers (depending on conteext): self-efficacy, execution, and individual identification with the organization

Publication

A school-based injury prevention program to reduce sport injury rick and improve healthy outcomes

Richmond SA, Kang J, Doyle-Baker PK, Nettel-Aguirre Am Emery CA

Clin J Sport Med July 2016


Who participated in this study?

725 junior high school students, aged 11-15, participating in physical education classes in two Calgary schools.

When did this study occur?

2008-2009 school year.

Why did we do this research?

To examine the effectiveness of a school-based high-intensity neuromuscular training program in reducing sport injury risk and improving health and fitness in youth.

What did we find?

A neuromuscular training program in junior high school physical education classes was effective in reducing sport-related injury and improving measures of adiposity and fitness.

Publication

Is body mass index a risk factor for sport injury in adolescents?

Richmond SA, Kang J, Emery CA

J Sci Med Sport September 2013


Who participated in this study?

4339 adolescents, aged 12-19, from 59 schools in Calgary, Alberta

When did this study occur?

Winter 2004 and Spring 2006

Why did we do this study?

To investigate the relationship between sport injury and body mass index in adolescents

What did we find?

The risk of sustaining a sport injury in obese adolescents was greater compared to those of a healthy weight.

Publication

The effectiveness of a neuromuscular training program in the prevention of injuries in youth

Emery C, Richmond S, Doyle-Baker T

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport January 2010


Who participated in this study?

Youth, aged 11-18, in Calgary, Alberta

When did this study occur?

Data from 2004-2005, 2006-2007, 2008-2009

Why did we do this research?

To examine the effectiveness of a neuromuscular training program to reduce the risk of injury in youth

What did we find?

A neuromuscular training program was effective in the reduction of acute onset injuries in youth basketball and soccer. A less-specific program was protective of all sport injury when delivered in physical education class at a junior high school

Publication

Development of a clinical static and dynamic standing balance measurement tool

Emery CA, Cassidy JD, Klassen TP, Rosychuck RJ, Rowe BB

Phys Ther June 2005


Who participated in this study?

123 students from Calgary high schools

When did this study occur?

Published June 2005

Why did we do this research?

To determine the reliability of eyes open and eyes open/closed balance measurements and to examine factors associated with balance.

What did we find?

Timed balance is an appropriate and reliable clinical measurement for use in adolescents and is influenced by previous injury.

Publication

Effectiveness of a home-based balance-training program in reducing sports-related injuries

Emery CA, Cassidy JD, Klassen TP, Rosychuk RJ, Rowe BH

CMAJ March 2005


Who participated in this study?

High school students in Calgary, Alberta

When did this study occur?

Fall of 2001

Why did we do this research?

To examine whether a balance training program reduced injury

What did we find?

There was a reduced injury risk for those doing the balance training program compared to normal controls

Publication