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NSERC scholarships reward excellence in grad student research talent

Seventeen doctoral students receive funding to support their studies
August 29, 2014
Teddy Seyed works with the Agile Surface Engineering group and the Rethinking Interaction, Collaboration and Engagement Lab in the Faculty of Science. Photo by Francisco Marinho Rodrigues

Teddy Seyed works with the Agile Surface Engineering group and the Rethinking Interaction, Collaboration and Engagement Lab in the Faculty of Science. Photo by Francisco Marinho Rodrigues

Cassandra Kinch is a student in Biological Sciences. Photo by Julia Klenin, Laura Herperger

Cassandra Kinch is a student in Biological Sciences. Photo by Julia Klenin, Laura Herperger

Kimberley Bell in Eagle Plain, Yukon, doing field work. Photo by Larry Lane, Geological Survey of Canada

Kimberley Bell in Eagle Plain, Yukon, doing field work. Photo by Larry Lane, Geological Survey of Canada

Doctoral students at the University of Calgary have once again been successful in the quest for funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. Seventeen students have each been awarded $21,000 to $35,000 towards their studies to fund their work and take their research to new levels.

“Our students’ success in earning these scholarships demonstrates the remarkable range of talent among students … at the University of Calgary. It’s also evidence of the investment of time and expertise among faculty members in these disciplines who have mentored their students to compete so successfully in the national NSERC scholarship competition,” says Dr. Lisa Young, vice-provost and dean (graduate studies).

The 2014 Alexander Graham Bell Canada Graduate Scholarships-Doctoral (CGS D) and NSERC Postgraduate Scholarships-Doctoral (PGS D) are:

  • Kyle Burns, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • Bradley Day, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • Sean Booth, Biological Sciences
  • Cassandra Kinch, Biological Sciences
  • Leslie Faught, Biological Sciences
  • Jesse Williams-Kovacs, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering
  • Monika Stolar, Chemistry
  • Ryan Harris, Civil Engineering
  • Paul Lapides, Computer Science
  • Alemayehu Seyed, Computer Science
  • Andrew Kwan, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Rachael L’Orsa, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Kimberley Bell, Geoscience
  • Delyle Polet, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Jaime Wong, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Mufaddal Baghdadwala, Neuroscience
  • Natalie Ronaghan, Gasterointestinal Sciences

Alexander Graham Bell Canada Graduate Scholarships-Doctoral (CGS D) and NSERC Postgraduate Scholarships-Doctoral (PGS D) provide financial support to high-calibre scholars who are selected for demonstrating academic excellence, research ability, communication abilities and proven leadership skills.

Cassandra Kinch, a PhD Candidate with the department of Biological Sciences, currently investigates the effects of both bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol S (BPS) on brain development and found that BPS — considered the safe alternative to BPA — actually alters brain development, causing hyperactive behaviour. “Receiving this scholarship allows me to focus on my research without distraction, and so I am excited see what new avenues my project will take,” Kinch says.

On receiving the NSERC award, doctoral student Teddy Seyed says, “The award isn't a reflection of me, but of my colleagues and supervisors that have helped me along the way. As a result, my research will now allow me to help others in a similar and meaningful way.”

Seyed works with the Agile Surface Engineering group headed by Prof. Frank Maurer and the Rethinking Interaction, Collaboration and Engagement Lab headed by assistant professor Anthony (Tony) Tang. Within these groups, Seyed focuses his own research on interaction design, usability and system design with multi-surface environments, as well as leading several industry research projects in fields such as oil and gas, medical, and retail.

Kimberley Bell, a PhD student with the Department of Geoscience, studies palynology which examines the pollen and spores in geological rock deposit. “I was honoured to receive this award,” Bell says. “Holding this award will allow me to devote more time to my research over the coming years.” When she isn’t conducting research in the field, or the lab, she can be found on the planning committee for the Geoscience Research and Exchange (GeoREX), an annual student symposium that seeks to instill a culture of sharing and collaboration within the geoscience department.

Read more about the Faculty of Graduate Studies and the Graduate Scholarship Office.