University of Calgary

Three researchers win national recognition for high-impact health-care projects

UToday HomeMarch 18, 2013

Professor Garnette Sutherland, a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, focuses in his research on the application of magnetic resonance imaging techniques to the study of neurological diseases.Professor Garnette Sutherland, a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, focuses in his research on the application of magnetic resonance imaging techniques to the study of neurological diseases.Three members of the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine are among those chosen by a peer-review panel of Canadian and international experts for the impact of their work on the health and well-being of Canadians and others worldwide.

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Canadian Medical Association Journal are acknowledging the top achievements in Canadian health research that have had a significant impact on health, health care and health research.

Brenda Hemmelgarn, Braden Manns and colleagues of the Interdisciplinary Chronic Disease Collaboration (Edmonton and Calgary)

Drs. Brenda Hemmelgarn and Braden Manns, together with their colleague from the University of Alberta, Dr. Marcello Tonelli, have been recognized for their research and knowledge translation activities. Their research has helped generate improvements in the treatments of high blood pressure, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and vascular disease. The collaborative work aims to improve both accessibility and quality of health care services across the province of Alberta.

Associate professors Brenda Hemmelgarn, centre, and Braden Manns, right, from the University of Calgary, along with Marcello Tonelli from the University of Alberta, collaborate in research and translation activities.Associate professors Brenda Hemmelgarn, centre, and Braden Manns, right, from the University of Calgary, along with Marcello Tonelli from the University of Alberta, collaborate in research and translation activities.The Interdisciplinary Chronic Disease Collaboration began meeting with key leaders at Alberta Health and Alberta Health Services in 2009 to ensure that their research findings can be of immediate benefit to the healthcare system and to the people in it.

Hemmelgarn and Manns are both associate professors in the departments of medicine and community health sciences as well as members of the Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta and the Institute for Public Health.

Garnette Sutherland for his contributions to the field of neurosurgery

Dr. Garnette Sutherland, a professor in the department of clinical neurosciences and a member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, receives the top achievements honour for improving surgical performance and patient outcomes with intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) surgery and the neuroArm, a robotic neurosurgical device.

Sutherland's research focuses on the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to the study of neurological diseases such as stroke and brain tumours. The intraoperative MRI technology can be used in the operating room to provide detailed three-dimensional images of the patient at any time during surgery. This allows for greater patient safety during the procedure.

Project neuroArm expands the use of intraoperative MRI by using an MR-compatible image-guided surgical robot. Controlled by a surgeon at a remote workstation, the neuroArm is capable of performing complex and precise microsurgical procedures. Both of these technologies promise to significantly improve the safety and success of brain tumour surgeries and other procedures that require great precision and accuracy.

 

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